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posted on 12.08.2021, 05:40 authored by Jiamei Luo, Yumiao Shi, Xiaoqiang Wang, Ruirui Zhang, Sifan Chen, Weifeng Yu, Diansan Su, Jie Tian
Background

Bibliometric analysis is used to gain a systematic understanding of developments in the field of the influence of anesthesia on tumor prognosis and changes in research hot spots over the past 20 years.

Methods

Relevant publications from the Web of Science Core Collection (WoSCC) were downloaded on May 5, 2021. Acquired data were then analyzed using the Online Analysis Platform of Literature Metrology (http://biblimetric.com) and the CiteSpace software was used to analyze and predict trends and hot spots in this field.

Results

1,521 publications on the influence of anesthesia on tumor prognosis were identified and 1494 qualifying records were included in the final analysis. The leading country in this field was the United States of America (USA). The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (Houston, TX, USA) and Pennsylvania State University (State College, PA, USA) featured the highest number of publications among all institutions. Co-citation cluster labels revealed characteristics of ten main clusters: total intravenous anesthesia, opioid growth factor receptor, gastric cancer cell, opioid receptor, murine model, natural killer cell activity, health-related quality, glioma cell, opioid switching and mu-type opioid receptor. Keyword burst detection indicated that randomized controlled trials (RCTs), volatile anesthetics, and ropivacaine were the newly emerging research hot spots.

Conclusions

This study compiled 1494 publications covering anesthesia and tumor prognosis research and showed that the direction of these studies is likely in transition from opioids and their receptors to other anesthetics, and from retrospective studies to prospective randomized controlled trials. It provides guidance for further research and clinical applications on choosing anesthetic methods and drugs.

History

References