Image6_DUF1005 Family Identification, Evolution Analysis in Plants, and Primary Root Elongation Regulation of CiDUF1005 From Caragana intermedia.TIF (2.08 MB)
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Image6_DUF1005 Family Identification, Evolution Analysis in Plants, and Primary Root Elongation Regulation of CiDUF1005 From Caragana intermedia.TIF

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posted on 29.03.2022, 04:22 authored by Xiaona Tian, Xiaocui Niu, Ziru Chang, Xiujuan Zhang, Ruigang Wang, Qi Yang, Guojing Li

Proteins with a domain of unknown function (DUF) represent a number of gene families that encode functionally uncharacterized proteins in eukaryotes. In particular, members of the DUF1005 family in plants have a 411-amino-acid conserved domain, and this family has not been described previously. In this study, a total of 302 high-confidence DUF1005 family members were identified from 58 plant species, and none were found in the four algae that were selected. Thus, this result showed that DUF1005s might belong to a kind of plant-specific gene family, and this family has not been evolutionarily expanded. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the DUF1005 family genes could be classified into four subgroups in 58 plant species. The earliest group to emerge was Group I, including a total of 100 gene sequences, and this group was present in almost all selected species spanning from mosses to seed plants. Group II and Group III, with 69 and 74 members, respectively, belong to angiosperms. Finally, with 59 members, Group IV was the last batch of genes to emerge, and this group is unique to dicotyledons. Expression pattern analysis of the CiDUF1005, a member of the DUF1005 family from Caragana intermedia, showed that CiDUF1005 genes were differentially regulated under various treatments. Compared to the wild type, transgenic lines with heterologous CiDUF1005 expression in Arabidopsis thaliana had longer primary roots and more lateral roots. These results expanded our knowledge of the evolution of the DUF1005 family in plants and will contribute to elucidating biological functions of the DUF1005 family in the future.

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