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Image2_Biomarker identification and pathway analysis of Astragalus membranaceus and Curcuma zedoaria couplet medicines on adenine-induced chronic kidn.TIF (2.2 MB)

Image2_Biomarker identification and pathway analysis of Astragalus membranaceus and Curcuma zedoaria couplet medicines on adenine-induced chronic kidney disease in rats based on metabolomics.TIF

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posted on 2023-04-06, 06:40 authored by Lingfei Lu, Jiandong Lu, Jiwei Chen, Bing Wang, Hongcheng Peng, Jinting Peng, Xinhui Liu, Feng Lin, Guoliang Xiong

Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is usually insidious, and most affected individuals are asymptomatic until the disease becomes advanced. The effective treatment of CKD would rely on the incorporation of multidisciplinary approaches. Astragalus membranaceus (AM) and Curcuma zedoaria (CZ) have been widely used in the treatment of CKD. However, the mechanism of AM and CZ in the treatment of CKD is still unclear.

Methods: This study was designed to evaluate the effects of AM and CZ on adenine-induced rats and to investigate the underlying mechanism by using metabolomic analysis. Addition of 0.75% adenine to the diet of rats for 3 weeks induced the animal model of CKD. The rats in the treatment group were treated with AM and CZ (2.1 g/kg/day) for 4 weeks. Blood and kidney samples were collected for biochemical and histological examination. Ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography/Q Exactive HFX mass spectrometer (UHPLC-QE-MS) was applied to analyze metabolic profiling variations in the kidney.

Results: The results showed that AM and CZ could significantly reduce serum creatinine (Scr) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels in CKD rats and alleviate renal pathological injury. By comparing the endogenous components of the normal group and the model group in positive ion mode and negative ion mode, a total of 365 and 155 different metabolites were screened, respectively. A total of 117 and 73 metabolites with significantly different expressions were identified between model group and AM and CZ group in positive ion mode and negative ion mode, respectively. The pivotal pathways affected by AM and CZ included nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism, and glycine, serine and threonine metabolism. Furthermore, significant changes in metabolites in CKD rats after AM and CZ therapies were observed, including L-Threonine, D-pantothenic acid, and nicotinamide. Moreover, we found that AM and CZ significantly reduced renal fibrosis and inflammation in CKD rats, which may be related to the regulation of SIRT1/JNK signaling pathway.

Conclusion: In conclusion, AM and CZ significantly reduced renal fibrosis and inflammation in CKD rats, which may be related to the regulation of SIRT1/JNK signaling pathway. Furthermore, L-Threonine, D-pantothenic acid, and nicotinamide may be potential biomarkers for the progression and treatment of CKD.

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