datasheet2_Comparable Intestinal and Hepatic First-Pass Effect of YL-IPA08 on the Bioavailability and Effective Brain Exposure, a Rapid Anti-PTSD and .xlsx (21.74 kB)
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datasheet2_Comparable Intestinal and Hepatic First-Pass Effect of YL-IPA08 on the Bioavailability and Effective Brain Exposure, a Rapid Anti-PTSD and Anti-Depression Compound.xlsx

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posted on 27.11.2020, 05:34 by You Gao, Chunmiao Yang, Lingchao Wang, Yanan Xiang, Wenpeng Zhang, Yunfeng Li, Xiaomei Zhuang

YL-IPA08, exerting rapid antidepressant-like and anxiolytic-like effects on behaviors by translocator protein (TSPO) mediation, is a novel compound that has been discovered and developed at our institute. Fit-for-purpose pharmacokinetic properties is urgently needed to be discovered as early as possible for a new compound. YL-IPA08 exhibited low bioavailability (∼6%) during the preliminary pharmacokinetics study in rats after oral administration. Our aim was to determine how metabolic disposition by microsomal P450 enzymes in liver and intestine limited YL-IPA08’s bioavailability and further affected brain penetration to the target. Studies of in vitro metabolic stability and permeability combined with in vivo oral bioavailability, panel CYP inhibitor co-administration via different routes, and double cannulation rats were conducted to elucidate the intestinal and hepatic first-pass effect of YL-IPA08 on bioavailability. Unbound brain-to-plasma ratio (Kp,uu) in rats was determined at steady state. Results indicated that P450-mediated elimination appeared to be important for its extensive first-pass effect with comparative contribution of gut (35%) and liver (17%), and no significant species difference was observed. The unbound concentration of YL-IPA08 in rat brain (6.5 pg/ml) was estimated based on Kp,uu (0.18) and was slightly higher than in vitro TSPO-binding activity (4.9 pg/ml). Based on the onset efficacy of YL-IPA08 toward TPSO in brain and Kp,uu, therapeutic human plasma concentration was predicted to be ∼27.2 ng/ml would easily be reached even with unfavorable bioavailability.

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