Table_8_Cortical Structural Connectivity Alterations and Potential Pathogenesis in Mid-Stage Sporadic Parkinson’s Disease.DOCX (24.07 kB)
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Table_8_Cortical Structural Connectivity Alterations and Potential Pathogenesis in Mid-Stage Sporadic Parkinson’s Disease.DOCX

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posted on 31.05.2021, 05:20 by Xia Deng, Zheng Liu, Qin Kang, Lin Lu, Yu Zhu, Renshi Xu

Many clinical symptoms of sporadic Parkinson’s disease (sPD) cannot be completely explained by a lesion of the simple typical extrapyramidal circuit between the striatum and substantia nigra. Therefore, this study aimed to explore the new potential damaged pathogenesis of other brain regions associated with the multiple and complex clinical symptoms of sPD through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A total of 65 patients with mid-stage sPD and 35 healthy controls were recruited in this study. Cortical structural connectivity was assessed by seed-based analysis using the vertex-based morphology of MRI. Seven different clusters in the brain regions of cortical thickness thinning derived from the regression analysis using brain size as covariates between sPD and control were selected as seeds. Results showed that the significant alteration of cortical structural connectivity mainly occurred in the bilateral frontal orbital, opercular, triangular, precentral, rectus, supplementary-motor, temporal pole, angular, Heschl, parietal, supramarginal, postcentral, precuneus, occipital, lingual, cuneus, Rolandic-opercular, cingulum, parahippocampal, calcarine, olfactory, insula, paracentral-lobule, and fusiform regions at the mid-stage of sPD. These findings suggested that the extensive alteration of cortical structural connectivity is one of possible pathogenesis resulting in the multiple and complex clinical symptoms in sPD.

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