Table_7_Proteome-Wide Identification of Lysine Propionylation in the Conidial and Mycelial Stages of Trichophyton rubrum.xlsx (20.49 kB)
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Table_7_Proteome-Wide Identification of Lysine Propionylation in the Conidial and Mycelial Stages of Trichophyton rubrum.xlsx

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posted on 12.11.2019, 09:41 by Xingye Xu, Xingwei Cao, Jian Yang, Lihong Chen, Bo Liu, Tao Liu, Qi Jin

Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) exist in a wide variety of organisms and play key roles in regulating various essential biological processes. Lysine propionylation is a newly discovered PTM that has rarely been identified in fungi. Trichophyton rubrum (T. rubrum) is one of the most common fungal pathogens in the world and has been studied as an important model organism of anthropic pathogenic filamentous fungi. In this study, we performed a proteome-wide propionylation analysis in the conidial and mycelial stages of T. rubrum. A total of 157 propionylated sites on 115 proteins were identified, and the high confidence of propionylation identification was validated by parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) assay. The results show that the propionylated proteins were mostly involved in various metabolic pathways. Histones and 15 pathogenicity-related proteins were also targets for propionylation modification, suggesting their roles in epigenetic regulation and pathogenicity. A comparison of the conidial and mycelial stages revealed that most propionylated proteins and sites were growth-stage specific and independent of protein abundance. Based on the function classifications, the propionylated proteins had a similar distribution in both stages; however, some differences were also identified. Furthermore, our results show that the concentration of propionyl-CoA had a significant influence on the propionylation level. In addition to the acetylation, succinylation and propionylation identified in T. rubrum, 26 other PTMs were also found to exist in this fungus. Overall, our study provides the first global propionylation profile of a pathogenic fungus. These results would be a foundation for further research on the regulation mechanism of propionylation in T. rubrum, which will enhance our understanding of the physiological features of T. rubrum and provide some clues for the exploration of improved therapies to treat this medically important fungus.

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