Table_7_Detecting the Multiomics Signatures of Factor-Specific Inflammatory Effects on Airway Smooth Muscles.XLSX (17.08 kB)
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Table_7_Detecting the Multiomics Signatures of Factor-Specific Inflammatory Effects on Airway Smooth Muscles.XLSX

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posted on 13.01.2021, 05:32 by Yu-Hang Zhang, Zhandong Li, Tao Zeng, Lei Chen, Hao Li, Tao Huang, Yu-Dong Cai

Smooth muscles are a specific muscle subtype that is widely identified in the tissues of internal passageways. This muscle subtype has the capacity for controlled or regulated contraction and relaxation. Airway smooth muscles are a unique type of smooth muscles that constitute the effective, adjustable, and reactive wall that covers most areas of the entire airway from the trachea to lung tissues. Infection with SARS-CoV-2, which caused the world-wide COVID-19 pandemic, involves airway smooth muscles and their surrounding inflammatory environment. Therefore, airway smooth muscles and related inflammatory factors may play an irreplaceable role in the initiation and progression of several severe diseases. Many previous studies have attempted to reveal the potential relationships between interleukins and airway smooth muscle cells only on the omics level, and the continued existence of numerous false-positive optimal genes/transcripts cannot reflect the actual effective biological mechanisms underlying interleukin-based activation effects on airway smooth muscles. Here, on the basis of newly presented machine learning-based computational approaches, we identified specific regulatory factors and a series of rules that contribute to the activation and stimulation of airway smooth muscles by IL-13, IL-17, or the combination of both interleukins on the epigenetic and/or transcriptional levels. The detected discriminative factors (genes) and rules can contribute to the identification of potential regulatory mechanisms linking airway smooth muscle tissues and inflammatory factors and help reveal specific pathological factors for diseases associated with airway smooth muscle inflammation on multiomics levels.

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