Table_7_Cannabis Use Increases the Risk of Sickness Absence: Longitudinal Analyses From the CONSTANCES Cohort.DOCX (12.58 kB)
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Table_7_Cannabis Use Increases the Risk of Sickness Absence: Longitudinal Analyses From the CONSTANCES Cohort.DOCX

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posted on 31.05.2022, 16:38 authored by Amélia Déguilhem, Annette Leclerc, Marcel Goldberg, Cédric Lemogne, Yves Roquelaure, Marie Zins, Guillaume Airagnes
Aims

To examine the longitudinal associations between cannabis use and risks of short (<7 days), medium (7-28 days), and long (>28 days) sickness absences at one-year follow-up.

Methods

87,273 participants aged 18-65 years from the French CONSTANCES cohort reported their frequency of cannabis use at inclusion between 2012 and 2018. Sickness absences occurring during one year of follow-up were collected from national medico-administrative registries. Multivariable generalized linear regressions were used to compute the Odds Ratios (OR) with their 95% Confidence Intervals (CI) of having at least one sickness absence at follow-up compared to no sickness absence, while controlling for sociodemographic factors, chronic conditions and occupational factors.

Results

Cannabis use more than once a month was associated with an increased risk of short (OR, [95% CI]: 1.56 [1.32–1.83]) and medium (1.29 [1.07–1.54]) sickness absences at one-year follow-up, with dose-dependent relationships for short sickness absences (1.13 [1.08–1.18], p-for-trend <0.001). In stratified analyses, cannabis use was associated with an increased risk of sickness absences in older individuals, men, participants with good self-rated health, living or having lived as a couple, and having an open-ended contract.

Conclusions

Cannabis use prospectively increased the risk of short and medium sickness absences, even from once a month and with a dose-dependent relationship for short sickness absences. These findings should be considered in information and prevention public health campaigns to alert the general population and workers to this increased risk.

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