Table_6_Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Unfolded Protein Response Was Induced During the Early Stage of Burkholderia pseudomallei Infection in A549 Cel.XLSX (25.24 MB)

Table_6_Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Unfolded Protein Response Was Induced During the Early Stage of Burkholderia pseudomallei Infection in A549 Cells.XLSX

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posted on 08.12.2020, 05:09 by Chenglong Rao, Chan Mao, Yupei Xia, Meijuan Zhang, Zhiqiang Hu, Siqi Yuan, Wenbo Yang, Jingmin Yan, Ling Deng, Xiaolian Cai, Xuhu Mao, Qian Li, Yaling Liao

Burkholderia pseudomallei is a zoonotic pathogen that usually affects patients' lungs and causes serious melioidosis. The interaction of B. pseudomallei with its hosts is complex, and cellular response to B. pseudomallei infection in humans still remains to be elucidated. In this study, transcriptomic profiling of B. pseudomallei-infected human lung epithelial A549 cells was performed to characterize the cellular response dynamics during the early infection (EI) stage. Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analyses were performed by using the online databases DAVID 6.8 and KOBAS 3.0. Real-time quantitative PCR and western blot were used for validation experiments. Compared with the negative control group (NC), a set of 36 common genes varied over time with a cut-off level of 1.5-fold change, and a P-value < 0.05 was identified. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that the PERK-mediated unfolded protein response (UPR) was enriched as the most noteworthy biological process category, which was enriched as a branch of UPR in the signaling pathway of protein processing in the endoplasmic reticulum. Other categories, such as inflammatory responses, cell migration, and apoptosis, were also focused. The molecular chaperone Bip (GRP78), PERK, and PERK sensor-dependent phosphorylation of eIF2α (p-eIF2α) and ATF4 were verified to be increasing over time during the EI stage, suggesting that B. pseudomallei infection activated the PERK-mediated UPR in A549 cells. Collectively, these results provide important initial insights into the intimate interaction between B. pseudomallei and lung epithelial cells, which can be further explored toward the elucidation of the cellular mechanisms of B. pseudomallei infections in humans.

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