Table_6_High Content Analysis Across Signaling Modulation Treatments for Subcellular Target Identification Reveals Heterogeneity in Cellular Response.XLSX (9.6 kB)
Download file

Table_6_High Content Analysis Across Signaling Modulation Treatments for Subcellular Target Identification Reveals Heterogeneity in Cellular Response.XLSX

Download (9.6 kB)
dataset
posted on 07.01.2021, 04:52 by Sayan Biswas

Cellular phenotypes on bioactive compound treatment are a result of the downstream targets of the respective treatment. Here, a computational approach is taken for downstream subcellular target identification to understand the basis of the cellular response. This response is a readout of cellular phenotypes captured from cell-painting-based light microscopy images. The readouts are morphological profiles measured simultaneously from multiple cellular organelles. Cellular profiles generated from roughly 270 diverse treatments on bone cancer cell line form the high content screen used in this study. Phenotypic diversity across these treatments is demonstrated, depending on the image-based phenotypic profiles. Furthermore, the impact of the treatments on specific organelles and associated organelle sensitivities are determined. This revealed that endoplasmic reticulum has a higher likelihood of being targeted. Employing multivariate regression overall cellular response is predicted based on fewer organelle responses. This prediction model is validated against 1,000 new candidate compounds. Different compounds despite driving specific modulation outcomes elicit a varying effect on cellular integrity. Strikingly, this confirms that phenotypic responses are not conserved that enables quantification of signaling heterogeneity. Agonist-antagonist signaling pairs demonstrate switch of the targets in the cascades hinting toward evidence of signaling plasticity. Quantitative analysis of the screen has enabled the identification of these underlying signatures. Together, these image-based profiling approaches can be employed for target identification in drug and diseased states and understand the hallmark of cellular response.

History

References