Table_6_Genome-Wide Association and Mechanistic Studies Indicate That Immune Response Contributes to Alzheimer’s Disease Development.XLSX (15.13 kB)

Table_6_Genome-Wide Association and Mechanistic Studies Indicate That Immune Response Contributes to Alzheimer’s Disease Development.XLSX

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posted on 24.09.2018, 07:19 by Changan Liu, Jacqueline Chyr, Weiling Zhao, Yungang Xu, Zhiwei Ji, Hua Tan, Claudio Soto, Xiaobo Zhou, for the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia. Although genome-wide association study (GWAS) have reported hundreds of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and genes linked to AD, the mechanisms about how these SNPs modulate the development of AD remain largely unknown. In this study, we performed GWAS for three traits in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and one clinical trait in the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) cohort. Our analysis identified five most significant AD related SNPs (FDR < 0.05) within or proximal to APOE, APOC1, and TOMM40. One of the SNPs was co-inherited with APOE allele 4, which is the most important genetic risk factor for AD. Three of the five SNPs were located in promoter or enhancer regions, and transcription factor (TF) binding affinity calculations showed dramatic changes (| Log2FC| > 2) of three TFs (PLAG1, RREB1, and ZBTB33) for two motifs containing SNPs rs2075650 and rs157580. In addition, our GWAS showed that both rs2075650 and rs157580 were significantly associated with the poliovirus receptor-related 2 (PVRL2) gene (FDR < 0.25), which is involved in spreading of herpes simplex virus (HSV). The altered regulation of PVRL2 may increase the susceptibility AD patients to HSV and other virus infections of the brain. Our work suggests that AD is a type of immune disorder driven by viral or microbial infections of the brain during aging.

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