Table_5_Genome-Wide Identification of Rare and Common Variants Driving Triglyceride Levels in a Nevada Population.xlsx (80.13 kB)
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Table_5_Genome-Wide Identification of Rare and Common Variants Driving Triglyceride Levels in a Nevada Population.xlsx

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posted on 02.03.2021, 04:42 by Robert W. Read, Karen A. Schlauch, Vincent C. Lombardi, Elizabeth T. Cirulli, Nicole L. Washington, James T. Lu, Joseph J. Grzymski

Clinical conditions correlated with elevated triglyceride levels are well-known: coronary heart disease, hypertension, and diabetes. Underlying genetic and phenotypic mechanisms are not fully understood, partially due to lack of coordinated genotypic-phenotypic data. Here we use a subset of the Healthy Nevada Project, a population of 9,183 sequenced participants with longitudinal electronic health records to examine consequences of altered triglyceride levels. Specifically, Healthy Nevada Project participants sequenced by the Helix Exome+ platform were cross-referenced to their electronic medical records to identify: (1) rare and common single-variant genome-wide associations; (2) gene-based associations using a Sequence Kernel Association Test; (3) phenome-wide associations with triglyceride levels; and (4) pleiotropic variants linked to triglyceride levels. The study identified 549 significant single-variant associations (p < 8.75 × 10–9), many in chromosome 11’s triglyceride hotspot: ZPR1, BUD13, APOC3, APOA5. A well-known protective loss-of-function variant in APOC3 (R19X) was associated with a 51% decrease in triglyceride levels in the cohort. Sixteen gene-based triglyceride associations were identified; six of these genes surprisingly did not include a single variant with significant associations. Results at the variant and gene level were validated with the UK Biobank. The combination of a single-variant genome-wide association, a gene-based association method, and phenome wide-association studies identified rare and common variants, genes, and phenotypes associated with elevated triglyceride levels, some of which may have been overlooked with standard approaches.

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