Table_5_Far-Red Light-Induced Azolla filiculoides Symbiosis Sexual Reproduction: Responsive Transcripts of Symbiont Nostoc azollae Encode Transporters.xlsx (1 MB)
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Table_5_Far-Red Light-Induced Azolla filiculoides Symbiosis Sexual Reproduction: Responsive Transcripts of Symbiont Nostoc azollae Encode Transporters Whilst Those of the Fern Relate to the Angiosperm Floral Transition.xlsx

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posted on 11.08.2021, 16:50 by Laura W. Dijkhuizen, Badraldin Ebrahim Sayed Tabatabaei, Paul Brouwer, Niels Rijken, Valerie A. Buijs, Erbil Güngör, Henriette Schluepmann

Water ferns of the genus Azolla and the filamentous cyanobacteria Nostoc azollae constitute a model symbiosis that enabled the colonization of the water surface with traits highly desirable for the development of more sustainable crops: their floating mats capture CO2 and fix N2 at high rates using light energy. Their mode of sexual reproduction is heterosporous. The regulation of the transition from the vegetative phase to the spore forming phase in ferns is largely unknown, yet a prerequisite for Azolla domestication, and of particular interest as ferns represent the sister lineage of seed plants. Sporocarps induced with far red light could be crossed so as to verify species attribution of strains from the Netherlands but not of the strain from the Anzali lagoon in Iran; the latter strain was assigned to a novel species cluster from South America. Red-dominated light suppresses the formation of dissemination stages in both gametophyte- and sporophyte-dominated lineages of plants, the response likely is a convergent ecological strategy to open fields. FR-responsive transcripts included those from MIKCC homologues of CMADS1 and miR319-controlled GAMYB transcription factors in the fern, transporters in N. azollae, and ycf2 in chloroplasts. Loci of conserved microRNA (miRNA) in the fern lineage included miR172, yet FR only induced miR529 and miR535, and reduced miR319 and miR159. Phylogenomic analyses of MIKCC TFs suggested that the control of flowering and flower organ specification may have originated from the diploid to haploid phase transition in the homosporous common ancestor of ferns and seed plants.

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