Table_4_Modified Systemic Inflammation Score Is an Independent Predictor of Long-Term Outcome in Patients Undergoing Surgery for Adenocarcinoma of the.DOCX (28.94 kB)
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Table_4_Modified Systemic Inflammation Score Is an Independent Predictor of Long-Term Outcome in Patients Undergoing Surgery for Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagogastric Junction.DOCX

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posted on 08.11.2021, 04:36 authored by Jianping Xiong, Wenzhe Kang, Fuhai Ma, Hao Liu, Shuai Ma, Yang Li, Peng Jin, Haitao Hu, Yantao Tian

Background: The modified systemic inflammation score (mSIS), which is calculated by a composite score of the lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio and the albumin content in serum, is identified as the new score to predict the prognosis for various cancers. However, its significance for patients with adenocarcinoma of esophagogastric junction (AEJ), who receive surgery, remains unclear.

Methods: This study retrospectively analyzed 317 patients with AEJ receiving surgery between September 2010 and December 2016. The associations between the mSIS and the clinicopathological features, overall survival (OS), as well as relapse-free survival (RFS), were assessed. In addition, the time-dependent receiver operating characteristic (t-ROC) curve analysis was performed for comparing the value of those scoring systems in predicting patient prognosis.

Results: Of the 317 cases, 119 were rated as mSIS 0, 123 as mSIS 1, and 75 as mSIS 2. Besides, mSIS was significantly related to age and tumor size. On multivariate analysis, mSIS was identified as a predictor to independently predict OS (p < 0.001) along with RFS (p < 0.001), and a significantly strong correlation was observed at the advanced pTNM stages based on the mSIS system. In the subgroup analysis of adjuvant chemotherapy and surgery alone, mSIS was still the predictor for independently predicting patient OS (p < 0.001) together with RFS (p < 0.001) for the two groups. T-ROC analysis showed that mSIS was more accurate than controlling nutritional status score in predicting OS and RFS.

Conclusions: The mSIS can serve as an easy, useful scoring system to independently predict the preoperative survival for AEJ cases undergoing surgery.

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