Table_4_Identification of Gene Modules and Hub Genes Involved in Mastitis Development Using a Systems Biology Approach.XLSX (5.26 MB)

Table_4_Identification of Gene Modules and Hub Genes Involved in Mastitis Development Using a Systems Biology Approach.XLSX

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posted on 13.07.2020 by Mohammad Reza Bakhtiarizadeh, Shabnam Mirzaei, Milad Norouzi, Negin Sheybani, Mohammad Sadegh Vafaei Sadi
Objective

Mastitis is defined as the inflammation of the mammary gland, which impact directly on the production performance and welfare of dairy cattle. Since, mastitis is a multifactorial complex disease and the molecular pathways underlying this disorder have not been clearly understood yet, a system biology approach was used in this study to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind mastitis.

Methods

Publicly available RNA-Seq data containing samples from milk of five infected and five healthy Holstein cows at five time points were retrieved. Gene Co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) approach and functional enrichment analysis were then applied with the aim to find the non-preserved module of genes that their connectivity were altered under infected condition. Hub genes were identified in the non-preserved modules and were subjected to protein-protein interactions (PPI) network construction.

Results

Among the 25 modules identified, eight modules were non-preserved and were also biologically associated with inflammation, immune response and mastitis development. Interestingly most of the hub genes in the eight modules were also densely connected in the PPI network. Of the hub genes, 250 genes were hubs in both co-expression and PPI networks and most of them were reported to play important roles in immune response or inflammatory pathways. The blue module was highly enriched in inflammatory responses and STAT1 was suggested to play an important role in mastitis development by regulating the immune related genes in this module. Moreover, a set of highly connected genes were identified such as BIRC3, PSMA6, FYN, F11R, NFKBIZ, NFKBIA, GRO1, PHB, CD3E, IL16, GSN, SOCS2, HCK, VAV1 and TLR6, which have been established to be critical for mastitis pathogenesis.

Conclusion

This study improved the understanding of the mechanisms underlying bovine mastitis and suggested eight non-preserved modules along with several most important genes with promising potential in etiology of mastitis.

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