Frontiers
Browse

sorry, we can't preview this file

Table_4_Diagnostic efficiency of metagenomic next-generation sequencing for suspected infection in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation .docx (18.21 kB)

Table_4_Diagnostic efficiency of metagenomic next-generation sequencing for suspected infection in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients.docx

Download (18.21 kB)
dataset
posted on 2023-09-13, 04:19 authored by Jiayu Huang, Yeqian Zhao, Chuanhe Jiang, Dongsheng Han, Zengkai Pan, Zilu Zhang, Luxiang Wang, Wei Chen, Su Li, Yanmin Zhao, Xiaoxia Hu
Introduction

Immunosuppression predisposes allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) recipients to infection. Prompt and accurate identification of pathogens is crucial to optimize treatment strategies. This multi-center retrospective study aimed to assess the ability of metagenomic next-generation sequencing (mNGS) to detect causative pathogens in febrile allo-HSCT recipients and examined its concordance with conventional microbiological tests (CMT).

Methods

We performed mNGS and CMT on samples obtained from 153 patients with suspected infection during allo-HSCT. Patients were grouped based on their neutropenic status at the time of sampling.

Results

The mNGS test was more sensitive than CMT (81.1% vs. 53.6%, P<0.001) for diagnosing clinically suspected infection, especially in the non-neutropenia cohort. mNGS could detect fungi and viruses better than bacteria, with a higher sensitivity than CMT. Immune events were diagnosed in 57.4% (35/61) of the febrile events with negative mNGS results, and 33.5% (48/143) with negative CMT results (P=0.002). The treatment success rate of the targeted anti-infection strategy was significantly higher when based on mNGS than on empirical antibiotics (85% vs. 56.5%, P=0.004).

Conclusion

The mNGS test is superior to CMT for identifying clinically relevant pathogens, and provides valuable information for anti-infection strategies in allo-HSCT recipients. Additionally, attention should be paid to immune events in patients with negative mNGS results.

History