Table_4_Detection of Allosteric Effects of lncRNA Secondary Structures Altered by SNPs in Human Diseases.XLSX (16.45 kB)

Table_4_Detection of Allosteric Effects of lncRNA Secondary Structures Altered by SNPs in Human Diseases.XLSX

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posted on 08.04.2020 by Xiaoyan Lu, Yu Ding, Yu Bai, Jing Li, Guosi Zhang, Siyu Wang, Wenyan Gao, Liangde Xu, Hong Wang

Recent studies have shown that structuralized long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play important roles in genetic and epigenetic processes. The spatial structures of most lncRNAs can be altered by distinct in vivo and in vitro cellular environments, as well as by DNA structural variations, such as single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and variants (SNVs). In the present study, we extended candidate SNPs that had linkage disequilibria with those significantly associated with lung diseases in genome-wide association studies in order to investigate potential disease mechanisms originating from SNP structural changes of host lncRNAs. Following accurate alignments, we recognized 115 ternary-relationship pairs among 41 SNPs, 10 lncRNA transcripts, and 1 type of lung disease (adenocarcinoma of the lung). Then, we evaluated the structural heterogeneity induced by SNP alleles by developing a local-RNA-structure alignment algorithm and employing randomized strategies to determine the significance of structural variation. We identified four ternary-relationship pairs that were significantly associated with SNP-induced lncRNA allosteric effects. Moreover, these conformational changes disrupted the interactive regions and binding affinities of lncRNA-HCG23 and TF-E2F6, suggesting that these may represent regulatory mechanisms in lung diseases. Taken together, our findings support that SNP-induced changes in lncRNA conformations regulate many biological processes, providing novel insight into the role of the lncRNA “structurome” in human diseases.

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