Table_4_Combined Untargeted and Targeted Metabolomics Approaches Reveal Urinary Changes of Amino Acids and Energy Metabolism in Canine Babesiosis With.xlsx (12.17 kB)
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Table_4_Combined Untargeted and Targeted Metabolomics Approaches Reveal Urinary Changes of Amino Acids and Energy Metabolism in Canine Babesiosis With Different Levels of Kidney Function.xlsx

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posted on 17.09.2021, 04:50 by Josipa Kuleš, Ivana Rubić, Blanka Beer Ljubić, Petra Bilić, Renata Barić Rafaj, Mirna Brkljačić, Richard Burchmore, David Eckersall, Vladimir Mrljak

Canine babesiosis is a tick-borne disease with a worldwide distribution, caused by the haemoprotozoan parasites of the genus Babesia. One of the most prevalent complication is acute kidney injury, and an early diagnosis of altered kidney function remains a challenge for veterinary practice. The aim of this study was to assess the urine metabolic profile from dogs with babesiosis and different degree of kidney function using untargeted and targeted MS-based metabolomics approaches. In this study, 22 dogs naturally infected with Babesia canis and 12 healthy dogs were included. Untargeted metabolomics approach identified 601 features with a differential abundance between the healthy group and groups of dogs with babesiosis and different level of kidney function, with 27 of them identified as a match to known standards; while targeted approach identified 17 metabolites with significantly different concentrations between the groups. A pattern of significantly altered metabolites referring to the inflammatory host response, oxidative stress, and energy metabolism modulation in babesiosis was presented. Our findings have demonstrated that kidney dysfunction accompanying canine babesiosis was associated with changes in amino acid metabolism, energy metabolism, fatty acid metabolism, and biochemical pathways such as urea cycle and ammonia detoxication. These findings will enable the inclusion of urinary markers for the detection and monitoring of renal damage in babesiosis, as well as in other similar diseases.

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