Table_4_Cnidarian Pattern Recognition Receptor Repertoires Reflect Both Phylogeny and Life History Traits.xlsx (21.33 kB)
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Table_4_Cnidarian Pattern Recognition Receptor Repertoires Reflect Both Phylogeny and Life History Traits.xlsx

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posted on 23.06.2021, 04:11 by Madison A. Emery, Bradford A. Dimos, Laura D. Mydlarz

Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are evolutionarily ancient and crucial components of innate immunity, recognizing danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and activating host defenses. Basal non-bilaterian animals such as cnidarians must rely solely on innate immunity to defend themselves from pathogens. By investigating cnidarian PRR repertoires we can gain insight into the evolution of innate immunity in these basal animals. Here we utilize the increasing amount of available genomic resources within Cnidaria to survey the PRR repertoires and downstream immune pathway completeness within 15 cnidarian species spanning two major cnidarian clades, Anthozoa and Medusozoa. Overall, we find that anthozoans possess prototypical PRRs, while medusozoans appear to lack these immune proteins. Additionally, anthozoans consistently had higher numbers of PRRs across all four classes relative to medusozoans, a trend largely driven by expansions in NOD-like receptors and C-type lectins. Symbiotic, sessile, and colonial cnidarians also have expanded PRR repertoires relative to their non-symbiotic, mobile, and solitary counterparts. Interestingly, cnidarians seem to lack key components of mammalian innate immune pathways, though similar to PRR numbers, anthozoans possess more complete immune pathways than medusozoans. Together, our data indicate that anthozoans have greater immune specificity than medusozoans, which we hypothesize to be due to life history traits common within Anthozoa. Overall, this investigation reveals important insights into the evolution of innate immune proteins within these basal animals.

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