Table_4_A Simple Culture Method Enhances the Recovery of Culturable Actinobacteria From Coastal Sediments.XLSX (11.5 kB)
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Table_4_A Simple Culture Method Enhances the Recovery of Culturable Actinobacteria From Coastal Sediments.XLSX

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posted on 14.06.2021, 05:54 by Zhaobin Huang, Shiqing Mo, Lifei Yan, Xiaomei Wei, Yuanyuan Huang, Lizhen Zhang, Shuhui Zhang, Jianzong Liu, Qingqing Xiao, Hong Lin, Yu Guo

Molecular methods revealed that the majority of microbes in natural environments remains uncultivated. To fully understand the physiological and metabolic characteristics of microbes, however, culturing is still critical for microbial studies. Here, we used bacterial community analysis and four culture media, namely, traditional marine broth 2216 (MB), water extracted matter (WEM), methanol extracted matter (MEM), and starch casein agar (SCA), to investigate the diversity of cultivated bacteria in coastal sediments. A total of 1,036 isolates were obtained in pure culture, and they were classified into five groups, namely, Alphaproteobacteria (52.51%), Gammaproteobacteria (23.26%), Actinobacteria (13.32%), Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes. Compared to other three media, WEM recovered a high diversity of actinobacteria (42 of 63 genotypes), with Micromonospora and Streptomyces as the most cultivated genera. Amplicon sequencing of the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene V3–V4 fragment revealed eight dominant groups, Alphaproteobacteria (12.81%), Gammaproteobacteria (20.07%), Deltaproteobacteria (12.95%), Chloroflexi (13.09%), Bacteroidetes (8.28%), Actinobacteria (7.34%), Cyanobacteria (6.20%), and Acidobacteria (5.71%). The dominant members affiliated to Actinobacteria belonged to “Candidatus Actinomarinales,” “Candidatus Microtrichales,” and Nitriliruptorales. The cultivated actinobacteria accounted for a small proportion (<5%) compared to the actinobacterial community, which supported that the majority of actinobacteria are still waiting for cultivation. Our study concluded that WEM could be a useful and simple culture medium that enhanced the recovery of culturable actinobacteria from coastal sediments.

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