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Table_3_Renal Water Conservation and Plasma Creatinine in Colorectal Cancer Surgery: A Single-Group Clinical Study.DOCX (24.15 kB)

Table_3_Renal Water Conservation and Plasma Creatinine in Colorectal Cancer Surgery: A Single-Group Clinical Study.DOCX

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posted on 2022-05-31, 09:39 authored by Yuhong Li, Rui He, Shuangyan Hu, Robert G. Hahn

Elevation of plasma creatinine after surgery is associated with postoperative morbidity and mortality. We studied whether lengthy surgery might induce renal conservation of water strong enough to exceed the renal capacity to excrete creatinine. Colorectal cancer surgery was performed via laparoscopy in 126 patients. Blood and urine were sampled before surgery, in the postoperative care unit, and 1 day after surgery. The Fluid Retention Index (FRI), which is a composite index of renal water conservation, was calculated. The mean FRI before surgery was 2.4, indicating that patients were well-hydrated. The FRI increased to 2.8 after surgery, and further to 3.5 on the first postoperative day. Plasma creatinine increased in 66 (52%) of the patients while plasma proteins were diluted by 15%. Patients with urinary creatinine > 8.5 mmol/L before surgery were more likely to later show elevation of plasma creatinine (68 vs. 46%, P < 0.04). The final FRI was higher in those with perioperative elevation of plasma creatinine (median 3.7 vs. 3.4; P < 0.01) and a similar difference was found for the final urinary creatinine concentration (8.5 vs. 7.2 mmol/L; P < 0.01). The gastrointestinal recovery time was prolonged when >2 L of Ringer's had been infused during the surgery. We conclude that colorectal surgery initiated a process of renal water conservation that extended into the postoperative period. The water conservation was more intense and the urinary concentration of creatinine was higher in those who had a perioperative rise in plasma creatinine.

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