Table_3_Mediators and Moderators of Reinforced Self-Affirmation as a Method for Reducing the Memory Misinformation Effect.xlsx (25.01 kB)
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Table_3_Mediators and Moderators of Reinforced Self-Affirmation as a Method for Reducing the Memory Misinformation Effect.xlsx

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posted on 23.11.2021, 04:15 authored by Malwina Szpitalak, Romuald Polczyk

The misinformation effect occurs when an eyewitness includes information in his or her account that is incongruent with the event he or she witnessed, and stems from being exposed to incorrect external sources. This is a serious threat to the quality of witness testimony and to the correctness of decisions reached by courts. However, few methods have been developed to reduce the vulnerability of witnesses to misinformation. This article presents such a method, namely, reinforced self-affirmation (RSA), which, by increasing memory confidence of witnesses, makes them less inclined to rely on external sources of information and more on their own memory. The effectiveness of this method was confirmed in three experiments. It was also found that memory confidence, but not general self-confidence, is a mediator of the impact of RSA on misinformation effect (ME), and that contingent self-esteem and feedback acceptance, but not sense of self-efficacy or general self-esteem, are moderators of this impact. It is concluded that RSA may be a promising basis for constructing methods, which can be used by forensic psychologists in real forensic settings.

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