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Table_3_Genome-wide association study of agronomical and root-related traits in spring barley collection grown under field conditions.docx (14.77 kB)

Table_3_Genome-wide association study of agronomical and root-related traits in spring barley collection grown under field conditions.docx

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posted on 2023-01-24, 04:33 authored by Piotr Ogrodowicz, Krzysztof Mikołajczak, Michał Kempa, Monika Mokrzycka, Paweł Krajewski, Anetta Kuczyńska

The root system is a key component for plant survival and productivity. In particular, under stress conditions, developing plants with a better root architecture can ensure productivity. The objectives of this study were to investigate the phenotypic variation of selected root- and yield-related traits in a diverse panel of spring barley genotypes. By performing a genome-wide association study (GWAS), we identified several associations underlying the variations occurring in root- and yield-related traits in response to natural variations in soil moisture. Here, we report the results of the GWAS based on both individual single-nucleotide polymorphism markers and linkage disequilibrium (LD) blocks of markers for 11 phenotypic traits related to plant morphology, grain quality, and root system in a group of spring barley accessions grown under field conditions. We also evaluated the root structure of these accessions by using a nondestructive method based on electrical capacitance. The results showed the importance of two LD-based blocks on chromosomes 2H and 7H in the expression of root architecture and yield-related traits. Our results revealed the importance of the region on the short arm of chromosome 2H in the expression of root- and yield-related traits. This study emphasized the pleiotropic effect of this region with respect to heading time and other important agronomic traits, including root architecture. Furthermore, this investigation provides new insights into the roles played by root traits in the yield performance of barley plants grown under natural conditions with daily variations in soil moisture content.

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