Table_3_Exome Sequencing in BRCA1-2 Candidate Familias: The Contribution of Other Cancer Susceptibility Genes.docx (25.8 kB)
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Table_3_Exome Sequencing in BRCA1-2 Candidate Familias: The Contribution of Other Cancer Susceptibility Genes.docx

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posted on 17.08.2021, 15:59 by Gabriella Doddato, Floriana Valentino, Annarita Giliberti, Filomena Tiziana Papa, Rossella Tita, Lucia Pia Bruno, Sara Resciniti, Chiara Fallerini, Elisa Benetti, Maria Palmieri, Maria Antonietta Mencarelli, Alessandra Fabbiani, Mirella Bruttini, Alfredo Orrico, Margherita Baldassarri, Francesca Fava, Diego Lopergolo, Caterina Lo Rizzo, Vittoria Lamacchia, Sara Mannucci, Anna Maria Pinto, Aurora Currò, Virginia Mancini, Oncologic Multidisciplinary Team, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese, Oncologic Multidisciplinary Team, Azienda Usl Toscana Sud Est, Francesca Mari, Alessandra Renieri, Francesca Ariani

Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer (HBOC) syndrome is a condition in which the risk of breast and ovarian cancer is higher than in the general population. The prevalent pathogenesis is attributable to inactivating variants of the BRCA1-2 highly penetrant genes, however, other cancer susceptibility genes may also be involved. By Exome Sequencing (ES) we analyzed a series of 200 individuals selected for genetic testing in BRCA1-2 genes according to the updated National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines. Analysis by MLPA was performed to detect large BRCA1-2 deletions/duplications. Focusing on BRCA1-2 genes, data analysis identified 11 cases with pathogenic variants (4 in BRCA1 and 7 in BRCA1-2) and 12 with uncertain variants (7 in BRCA1 and 5 in BRCA2). Only one case was found with a large BRCA1 deletion. Exome analysis allowed to characterize pathogenic variants in 21 additional genes: 10 genes more traditionally associated to breast and ovarian cancer (ATM, BRIP1, CDH1, PALB2, PTEN, RAD51C, and TP53) (5% diagnostic yield) and 11 in candidate cancer susceptibility genes (DPYD, ERBB3, ERCC2, MUTYH, NQO2, NTHL1, PARK2, RAD54L, and RNASEL). In conclusion, this study allowed a personalized risk assessment and clinical surveillance in an increased number of HBOC families and to broaden the spectrum of causative variants also to candidate “non-canonical” genes.

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