Table_3_Effect of Chronic Exercise Training on Blood Lactate Metabolism Among Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review and Meta-Ana.DOCX (15.98 kB)
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Table_3_Effect of Chronic Exercise Training on Blood Lactate Metabolism Among Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.DOCX

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posted on 11.03.2021, 06:09 by Tong Zhao, Shenglong Le, Nils Freitag, Moritz Schumann, Xiuqiang Wang, Sulin Cheng

Purpose: To assess the effect of chronic exercise training on blood lactate metabolism at rest (i.e., basal lactate concentrations) and during exercise (i.e., blood lactate concentration at a fixed load, load at a fixed blood lactate concentration, and load at the individual blood lactate threshold) among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).

Methods: PubMed (MedLine), Embase, Web of Science, and Scopus were searched. Randomized controlled trials, non-randomized controlled trials, and case-control studies using chronic exercise training (i.e., 4 weeks) and that assessed blood lactate concentrations at rest and during exercise in T2DM patients were included.

Results: Thirteen studies were eligible for the systematic review, while 12 studies with 312 participants were included into the meta-analysis. In the pre-to-post intervention meta-analysis, chronic exercise training had no significant effect on changes in basal blood lactate concentrations (standardized mean difference (SMD) = −0.20; 95% CI, −0.55 to 0.16; p = 0.28), and the results were similar when comparing the effect of intervention and control groups. Furthermore, blood lactate concentration at a fixed load significantly decreased (SMD = −0.73; 95% CI, −1.17 to −0.29; p = 0.001), while load at a fixed blood lactate concentration increased (SMD = 0.40; 95% CI, 0.07 to 0.72; p = 0.02) after chronic exercise training. No change was observed in load at the individual blood lactate threshold (SMD = 0.28; 95% CI, −0.14 to 0.71; p = 0.20).

Conclusion: Chronic exercise training does not statistically affect basal blood lactate concentrations; however, it may decrease the blood lactate concentrations during exercise, indicating improvements of physical performance capacity which is beneficial for T2DM patients' health in general. Why chronic exercise training did not affect basal blood lactate concentrations needs further investigation.

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