Table_3_Correlations Between the Characteristics of Alternative Splicing Events, Prognosis, and the Immune Microenvironment in Breast Cancer.XLSX (121.41 kB)
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Table_3_Correlations Between the Characteristics of Alternative Splicing Events, Prognosis, and the Immune Microenvironment in Breast Cancer.XLSX

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posted on 14.06.2021, 05:48 by Youyuan Deng, Hongjun Zhao, Lifen Ye, Zhiya Hu, Kun Fang, Jianguo Wang
Objective

Alternative splicing (AS) is the mechanism by which a few genes encode numerous proteins, and it redefines the concept of gene expression regulation. Recent studies showed that dysregulation of AS was an important cause of tumorigenesis and microenvironment formation. Therefore, we performed a systematic analysis to examine the role of AS in breast cancer (Breast Cancer, BrCa) progression.

Methods

The present study included 993 BrCa patients from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database in the genome-wide analysis of AS events. We used differential and prognostic analyses and found differentially expressed alternative splicing (DEAS) events and independent prognostic factors related to patients’ overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS). We divided the patients into two groups based on these AS events and analyzed their clinical features, molecular subtyping and immune characteristics. We also constructed a splicing factor (SF) regulation network for key AS events and verified the existence of AS events in tissue samples using real-time quantitative PCR.

Results

A total of 678 AS events were identified as differentially expressed, of which 13 and 10 AS events were independent prognostic factors of patients’ OS and DFS, respectively. Unsupervised clustering analysis based on these prognostic factors indicated that the Cluster 1 group had a better prognosis and more immune cell infiltration. SFs were significantly related to the expression of AS events, and AA-RPS21 was significantly upregulated in tumors.

Conclusion

Alternative splicing expands the mechanism of breast cancer progression from a new perspective. Notably, alternative splicing may affect the patient’s prognosis by affecting the infiltration of immune cells. Our research provides important guidance for subsequent studies of AS in breast cancer.

History

References