Table_2_Tubular ER Associates With Diacylglycerol-Rich Structures During Lipid Droplet Consumption.xlsx (27.95 kB)

Table_2_Tubular ER Associates With Diacylglycerol-Rich Structures During Lipid Droplet Consumption.xlsx

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posted on 29.07.2020 by Suriakarthiga Ganesan, Marjan Tavassoli, Brittney N. Shabits, Vanina Zaremberg

Growth resumption from stationary phase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is characterized by lipid droplet (LD) consumption and channeling of lipid precursors toward synthesis of membranes. We have previously determined that triacylglycerol lipolysis contributes to a pool of diacylglycerol (DAG) associated with the yeast vacuole that is enriched in structures that are in close proximity to LDs. In this study we have monitored these structures using a DAG sensor fused to GFP during isolation of LDs. A unique fraction containing the DAG sensor, with low presence of LDs, was identified. Membranes enriched in the DAG probe were obtained by immunoaffinity purification using a GFP nanobody, and the associated proteome was investigated by mass spectrometry. It was determined this LD-associated fraction was enriched in proteins known to shape the tubular endoplasmic reticulum (ER) like Yop1, Sey1, Rtn1, and Rtn2. Consistently, cells lacking three of these proteins (rtn1Δ rtn2Δ yop1Δ) exhibited delayed LD consumption, larger LDs and abnormal LD distribution. In addition, the triple mutant displayed aberrant localization of the DAG sensor after 5 h of growth resumption from stationary phase. Manipulation of DAG levels by overexpression of the DAG kinase Dgk1, impacted localization of the DAG probe and affected fitness of the triple mutant. Altogether these results link LD consumption to tubular ER expansion as a gateway of lipid precursors that otherwise accumulate in vacuolar associated membranes or other internal compartments. Furthermore, conversion of DAG to phosphatidic acid (PA) in the absence of a functional tubular ER was toxic to cells, suggesting the ratio of PA to DAG is critical to allow growth progression.

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