Table_2_Short Term Intrarectal Administration of Sodium Propionate Induces Antidepressant-Like Effects in Rats Exposed to Chronic Unpredictable Mild Stress.DOC (70.5 kB)
Download file

Table_2_Short Term Intrarectal Administration of Sodium Propionate Induces Antidepressant-Like Effects in Rats Exposed to Chronic Unpredictable Mild Stress.DOC

Download (70.5 kB)
dataset
posted on 27.09.2018, 04:21 by Jianguo Li, Luwen Hou, Cui Wang, Xueyang Jia, Xuemei Qin, Changxin Wu

Depression has been correlated with metabolic disorders, and the gut microbiota and its metabolites have been reported to be key factors affecting metabolic disorders. Several metabolites generated by the gut microbiota have been reported to exert antidepressant-like effects, including the short chain fatty acid (SCFA) butyrate. However, recent work has suggested that the abundance of butyrate is not significantly changed in neither human nor experimental animals with depression, and butyrate has been reported to decrease upon the administration of prebiotics with antidepressant-like effects. Supplementation of endogenous metabolites that are unchanged in depression may induce additional metabolic disorders and may lead to poorer clinical outcomes. However, the endogenous metabolites that are imbalanced in depression may include several antidepressant candidates that could circumvent these problems. In this study, we used GC-MS spectrometry to study the fecal metabolome of rats under Chronic Unpredictable Mild Stress (CUMS). We carried out static and dynamic metabolomics analyses to identify the differential metabolites between the CUMS rats and control rats. We identified propionic acid, rather than butyric acid, as a differential metabolite of the CUMS rats. Consistent with this, a 1-week intrarectal administration of sodium propionate (NaP, the salt form of propionic acid) induced antidepressant-like effects and partially rebalanced the plasma metabolome. The antidepressant-like effects of NaP were correlated with differential rescue of neurotransmitters in the prefrontal cortex, which may be achieved through the reduction of catabolism of noradrenaline, tryptophan and dopamine, rather than serotonin. These findings support NaP as a potential candidate in fighting depression by administering an endogenous metabolite.

History

References