Table_2_SCI1 Is a Direct Target of AGAMOUS and WUSCHEL and Is Specifically Expressed in the Floral Meristematic Cells.XLSX (12.27 kB)
Download file

Table_2_SCI1 Is a Direct Target of AGAMOUS and WUSCHEL and Is Specifically Expressed in the Floral Meristematic Cells.XLSX

Download (12.27 kB)
dataset
posted on 18.03.2021, 05:34 by Joelma O. Cruz, Juca A. B. San Martin, Greice Lubini, Edward J. Strini, Rómulo Sobral, Vitor F. Pinoti, Pedro B. Ferreira, Vanessa Thomé, Andréa C. Quiapim, Marcelo C. Dornelas, Maria Cristina S. Pranchevicius, Francisco Madueño, M. Manuela R. Costa, Maria Helena S. Goldman

The specified floral meristem will develop a pre-established number of floral organs and, thus, terminate the floral meristematic cells. The floral meristematic pool of cells is controlled, among some others, by WUSCHEL (WUS) and AGAMOUS (AG) transcription factors (TFs). Here, we demonstrate that the SCI1 (Stigma/style cell-cycle inhibitor 1) gene, a cell proliferation regulator, starts to be expressed since the floral meristem specification of Nicotiana tabacum and is expressed in all floral meristematic cells. Its expression is higher in the floral meristem and the organs being specified, and then it decreases from outside to inside whorls when the organs are differentiating. SCI1 is co-expressed with N. tabacum WUSCHEL (NtWUS) in the floral meristem and the whorl primordia at very early developmental stages. Later in development, SCI1 is co-expressed with NAG1 (N. tabacum AG) in the floral meristem and specialized tissues of the pistil. In silico analyses identified cis-regulatory elements for these TFs in the SCI1 genomic sequence. Yeast one-hybrid and electrophoresis mobility shift assay demonstrated that both TFs interact with the SCI1 promoter sequence. Additionally, the luciferase activity assay showed that NAG1 clearly activates SCI1 expression, while NtWUS could not do so. Taken together, our results suggest that during floral development, the spatiotemporal regulation of SCI1 by NtWUS and NAG1 may result in the maintenance or termination of proliferative cells in the floral meristem, respectively.

History