Table_2_Loss of G-Protein Pathway Suppressor 2 Promotes Tumor Growth Through Activation of AKT Signaling.XLSX (7.1 MB)
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Table_2_Loss of G-Protein Pathway Suppressor 2 Promotes Tumor Growth Through Activation of AKT Signaling.XLSX

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posted on 07.01.2021, 04:29 by Stefanie Chan, Emma Smith, Yuan Gao, Julian Kwan, Benjamin C. Blum, Andrew M. Tilston-Lunel, Isabella Turcinovic, Xaralabos Varelas, Maria Dafne Cardamone, Stefano Monti, Andrew Emili, Valentina Perissi

G Protein Suppressor 2 (GPS2) is a multifunctional protein that exerts important roles in inflammation and metabolism in adipose, liver, and immune cells. GPS2 has recently been identified as a significantly mutated gene in breast cancer and other malignancies and proposed to work as a putative tumor suppressor. However, molecular mechanisms by which GPS2 prevents cancer development and/or progression are largely unknown. Here, we have profiled the phenotypic changes induced by GPS2 depletion in MDA-MB-231 triple negative breast cancer cells and investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms. We found that GPS2-deleted MDA-MB-231 cells exhibited increased proliferative, migratory, and invasive properties in vitro, and conferred greater tumor burden in vivo in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model. Transcriptomic, proteomic and phospho-proteomic profiling of GPS2-deleted MBA-MB-231 revealed a network of altered signals that relate to cell growth and PI3K/AKT signaling. Overlay of GPS2-regulated gene expression with MDA-MB-231 cells modified to express constitutively active AKT showed significant overlap, suggesting that sustained AKT activation is associated with loss of GPS2. Accordingly, we demonstrate that the pro-oncogenic phenotypes associated with GPS2 deletion are rescued by pharmacological inhibition of AKT with MK2206. Collectively, these observations confirm a tumor suppressor role for GPS2 and reveal that loss of GPS2 promotes breast cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth through uncontrolled activation of AKT signaling. Moreover, our study points to GPS2 as a potential biomarker for a subclass of breast cancers that would be responsive to PI3K-class inhibitor drugs.

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