Table_2_Identification of Key Transcription Factors and Immune Infiltration Patterns Associated With Breast Cancer Prognosis Using WGCNA and Cox Regre.xlsx (204.38 kB)
Download file

Table_2_Identification of Key Transcription Factors and Immune Infiltration Patterns Associated With Breast Cancer Prognosis Using WGCNA and Cox Regression Analysis.xlsx

Download (204.38 kB)
dataset
posted on 21.12.2021, 04:13 by Xin Yin, Jiaxiang Liu, Xin Wang, Tianshu Yang, Gen Li, Yaxin Shang, Xu Teng, Hefen Yu, Shuang Wang, Wei Huang

Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death among women worldwide. Therefore, the need for effective breast cancer treatment is urgent. Transcription factors (TFs) directly participate in gene transcription, and their dysregulation plays a key role in breast cancer. Our study identified 459 differentially expressed TFs between tumor and normal samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas database. Based on gene expression analysis and weighted gene co-expression network analysis, the co-expression yellow module was found to be integral for breast cancer progression. A total of 121 genes in the yellow module were used for function enrichment. To further confirm prognosis-related TFs, COX regression and LASSO analyses were performed; consequently, a prognostic risk model was constructed, and its validity was verified. Ten prognosis-related TFs were identified according to their expression profile, survival probability, and target genes. COPS5, HDAC2, and NONO were recognized as hub TFs in breast cancer. These TFs were highly expressed in human breast cancer cell lines and clinical breast cancer samples; this result was consistent with the information from multiple databases. Immune infiltration analysis revealed that the proportions of resting dendritic and mast cells were greater in the low-risk group than those in the high-risk group. Thus, in this study, we identified three hub biomarkers related to breast cancer prognosis. The results provide a framework for the co-expression of TF modules and immune infiltration in breast cancer.

History

References