Table_2_Detailed Soluble Proteome Analyses of a Dairy-Isolated Enterococcus faecalis: A Possible Approach to Assess Food Safety and Potential Probioti.XLSX (196.78 kB)

Table_2_Detailed Soluble Proteome Analyses of a Dairy-Isolated Enterococcus faecalis: A Possible Approach to Assess Food Safety and Potential Probiotic Value.XLSX

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posted on 17.05.2019, 08:16 by Simona Cirrincione, Bernd Neumann, Daniela Zühlke, Katharina Riedel, Enrica Pessione

Enterococci are common inhabitants of the gastrointestinal tracts of humans and animals and thanks to their capability to tolerate different environmental conditions and their high rates of gene transfer, they are able to colonize various ecological niches, as food matrices. Enterococcus faecalis bacteria are defined as controversial microorganisms. From one side they are used as food starters, bio-control agents and probiotics to improve human or animal health. From the other side, in the last two decades enterococci have emerged as important nosocomial pathogens, because bearing high-level of resistance to antibiotics and several putative virulence factors. In this study, the soluble proteome quantitation data (LC-MS/MS) of the food-isolated strain E. faecalis D27 (dairy-isolate) was compared with the soluble proteome quantitation data of the pathogenic E. faecalis UW3114 (urinary tract infection isolate) and with the one of the health promoting strain E. faecalis Symbioflor1, respectively. The comparison of cytosolic protein expression profiles highlighted statistically significant changes in the abundance of proteins mainly involved in specific metabolic pathways, nutrient transport, stress response, and cell wall modulation. Moreover, especially in the dairy isolate and the clinical isolate, several proteins with potential pathogenic implications were found, such as serine proteases, von Willebrand factor, serine hydrolase with beta lactamase activity, efflux transporter, and proteins involved in horizontal gene transfer. The analysis of the extracellular proteome provided interesting results concerning proteins involved in bacterial communication, such as pheromones and conjugative elements and also proteins able to interact with human components. The phenotypic characterization evaluating (i) biofilm formation (ii) hemolytic activity on blood agar plates (iii) protease activity (iv) gelatinase (v) antibiotic resistance pattern, enabled us to elucidate the risks associated with the poor characterized foodborne E. faecalis D27.

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