Table_2_Correlates of Adherence of Multimodal Non-pharmacological Interventions in Older Adults With Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Cross-Sectional Stud.DOCX (664.37 kB)
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Table_2_Correlates of Adherence of Multimodal Non-pharmacological Interventions in Older Adults With Mild Cognitive Impairment: A Cross-Sectional Study.DOCX

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posted on 03.06.2022, 04:52 authored by Xue Sun, Lina Wang, Xinhua Shen, Cheng Huang, Zhuqin Wei, Liming Su, Simeng Wang, Xiaoshen Liu, Xueting Zhen
Background

Non-pharmacological interventions are promising for delaying cognitive decline in older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Although some studies have demonstrated adherence rates and factors influencing participation in single modality non-pharmacological interventions, little is known about the level and correlates of adherence to multimodal non-pharmacological interventions (MNPIs) in older adults with MCI.

Objective

This study aimed to explore the adherence level and the correlates of adherence to MNPIs in older adults with MCI.

Methods

A cross-sectional design was employed. Community-dwelling older adults aged 60 years and over were recruited from senior community centers and healthcare centers in Huzhou from March 2019 to December 2020. Data were collected by a general information questionnaire and the adherence scale of cognitive dysfunction management (AS-CDM) in older adults with MCI. Hierarchical regression analyses were applied to explore the correlates of adherence to MNPIs.

Results

A total of 216 completed questionnaires were finally analyzed. Of these, 68.52% were female, and 45.4% of the participants had no less than 6 years of education. The overall mean score for adherence was 117.58 (SD = 10.51) out of 160, equivalent to 73.49 in the hundred-mark system, indicating a medium-level adherence to MNPIs in older adults with MCI. Of the five dimensions of adherence (AS-CDM), self-efficacy scored the highest, and the lowest was perceived barriers. The univariate analysis showed that the factors associated with the adherence to MNPIs were: regular physical exercise, meat-vegetable balance, absence of multimorbidity, high level of education, living alone, and living in urban (p < 0.05). In the hierarchical regression analysis, the final model explained 18.8% of variance in overall adherence (p < 0.01), which high school (Beta = 0.161, p < 0.05), college and above more (Beta = 0.171, p < 0.05), meat-vegetarian balance (Beta = 0.228, p < 0.05), regular physical exercise (Beta = 0.234, p < 0.05), and presence of multimorbidity (Beta = −0.128, p < 0.05) significantly contributed to adherence. In addition, nearly 80% of older adults with MCI preferred MNPIs.

Conclusion

Early assessment and management of adherence to MNPIs were essential in older adults with MCI. Furthermore, the findings shed light on several critical areas of intervention to improve adherence to MNPIs in older adults with MCI.

Clinical Trial Registration

http://www.chictr.org.cn/showproj.aspx?proj=35363, ChiCTR1900020950 (Registered on January 23, 2019).

History

References