Table_2_Chronic Hepatitis Virus Infection Are Associated With High Risk of Gastric Cancer: A Systematic Review and Cumulative Analysis.doc (41 kB)
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Table_2_Chronic Hepatitis Virus Infection Are Associated With High Risk of Gastric Cancer: A Systematic Review and Cumulative Analysis.doc

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posted on 08.07.2021, 15:08 by Yusha Yang, Zufu Jiang, Weizhou Wu, Libin Ruan, Chengyang Yu, Yuning Xi, Liling Wang, Kunpeng Wang, Jinggang Mo, Shankun Zhao

Mounting studies demonstrated both chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) and chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection might be associated not only with an increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma but also extrahepatic malignancies, i.e., gastric cancer (GC). However, a quantitative result addressing the association between HBV/HCV infection and GC development is scarce. A systematic search to identify the eligible studies was performed in four databases, including MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and the PsychINFO. The relationship between HBV/HCV infection and the risk of GC was quantified by calculating the hazard ratio (HR) with a 95% confidence interval (CI). More methodologies of this study were available in the PROSPERO (ID: CRD42021243719). Thirteen included studies involving 7,027,546 individuals (mean age, 42.6-71.9 years) were enrolled in the pooled analyses. Two articles provided the clinical data of both HBV and HCV infections. The proportion of high methodological quality studies was 76.9% (10/13). Synthetic results from 10 eligible studies of HBV showed that HBV infection was associated with a significantly higher risk of GC when compared with the healthy controls without HBV infection (pooled HR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.08–1.47; P = 0.003; heterogeneity, I2 = 89.3%; P< 0.001). In line with this finding, the combined effect derived from five included studies of HCV also supported a significant positive association between chronic HBV infection and GC development (pooled HR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.28–2.76; P = 0.001; heterogeneity, I2 = 74.7%; P = 0.003). In conclusion, both chronic HBV and HCV infections were related to a high risk of GC. The plausible mechanisms underlying such association might be correlated to HBV/HCV infection-induced persistent inflammation, immune dysfunction, and cirrhosis.

Systematic Review Registration

PROSPERO (http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO), identifier (CRD42021243719).

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