Table_2_Association of Body Mass Index With Somatic Mutations in Breast Cancer.docx (13.92 kB)
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Table_2_Association of Body Mass Index With Somatic Mutations in Breast Cancer.docx

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posted on 01.04.2021, 05:23 by Bo Chen, Liping Guo, Kai Li, Weikai Xiao, Yingzi Li, Cheukfai Li, Hsiaopei Mok, Li Cao, Jiali Lin, Guangnan Wei, Guochun Zhang, Ning Liao
Background

The relationship between body mass index (BMI) and the prognosis or treatment response in patients with breast cancer has been demonstrated in previous studies, but the somatic mutation profiles in breast cancer patients with different BMIs have not been explored.

Methods

In the present study, the somatic mutation profiles in 421 female breast cancer patients who were stratified into three subgroups based on BMI (normal weight, overweight/obese, and underweight) were investigated. Capture-based targeted sequencing was performed using a panel comprising 520 cancer-related genes.

Results

A total of 3547 mutations were detected in 390 genes. In breast cancer patients with different BMI statuses, the tumors exhibited high mutation frequency and burden. TP53 was the most common gene in the three groups, followed by PIK3CA, ERBB2, and CDK12. Meanwhile, the mutation hotspots in TP53 and PIK3CA were the same in the three BMI groups. More JAK1 mutations were identified in underweight patients than those in normal patients. Except for JAK1, differentially mutated genes in postmenopausal patients were completely different from those in premenopausal patients. The distribution of mutation types was significantly different among BMI groups in the postmenopausal group. Underweight patients in the postmenopausal group harbored more TP53 mutations, more amplifications, and more mutations in genes involved in the WNT signaling pathway.

Conclusions

Our next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based gene panel analysis revealed the gene expression profiles of breast cancer patients with different BMI statuses. Although genes with high mutation frequency and burden were found in different BMI groups, some subtle differences could not be ignored. JAK1 mutations might play a vital role in the progression of breast cancer in underweight patients, and this needs further analysis. Postmenopausal underweight patients with breast cancer have more aggressive characteristics, such as TP53 mutations, more amplifications, and more mutations in genes involved in the WNT signaling pathway. This study provides new evidence for understanding the characteristics of breast cancer patients with different BMIs.

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