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Table_2_A Comprehensive Proteome and Acetyl-Proteome Atlas Reveals Molecular Mechanisms Adapting to the Physiological Changes From Pre-laying to Peak-.xlsx (29.88 kB)

Table_2_A Comprehensive Proteome and Acetyl-Proteome Atlas Reveals Molecular Mechanisms Adapting to the Physiological Changes From Pre-laying to Peak-Laying Stage in Liver of Hens (Gallus gallus).xlsx

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posted on 2021-10-21, 04:04 authored by Zhang Wang, Dandan Wang, Keren Jiang, Yulong Guo, Zhuanjian Li, Ruirui Jiang, Ruili Han, Guoxi Li, Yadong Tian, Hong Li, Xiangtao Kang, Xiaojun Liu

Along with sexual maturity, the liver undergoes numerous metabolic processes to adapt the physiological changes associated with egg-laying in hens. However, mechanisms regulating the processes were unclear. In this study, comparative hepatic proteome and acetyl-proteome between pre- and peak-laying hens were performed. The results showed that the upregulated proteins were mainly related to lipid and protein biosynthesis, while the downregulated proteins were mainly involved in pyruvate metabolism and were capable of inhibiting gluconeogenesis and lactate synthesis in peak-laying hens compared with that in pre-laying hens. With unchanged expression level, the significant acetylated proteins were largely functioned on activation of polyunsaturated fatty acid oxidation in peroxisome, while the significant deacetylated proteins were principally used to elevate medium and short fatty acid oxidation in mitochondria and oxidative phosphorylation. Most of the proteins which involved in gluconeogenesis, lipid transport, and detoxification were influenced by both protein expression and acetylation. Taken overall, a novel mechanism wherein an alternate source of acetyl coenzyme A was produced by activation of FA oxidation and pyruvate metabolism to meet the increased energy demand and lipid synthesis in liver of laying hens was uncovered. This study provides new insights into molecular mechanism of adaptation to physiological changes in liver of laying hens.

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