Table_1_Uric Acid Variability as a Predictive Marker of Newly Developed Cardiovascular Events in Type 2 Diabetes.DOCX (12.71 kB)

Table_1_Uric Acid Variability as a Predictive Marker of Newly Developed Cardiovascular Events in Type 2 Diabetes.DOCX

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posted on 02.12.2021, 04:22 by Hae Kyung Kim, Minyoung Lee, Yong-ho Lee, Byung-Wan Lee, Bong-Soo Cha, Eun Seok Kang

Background: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is associated with morbidity and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). However, the role of serum uric acid as a risk factor for developing cardiovascular disease is controversial. This study investigated whether uric acid variability was associated with new-onset symptomatic CVD in patients with T2D, requiring percutaneous coronary intervention.

Methods: A total of 1,071 patients were enrolled in this retrospective cross-sectional study after propensity score matching. Patients with T2D and new-onset symptomatic CVD who received percutaneous coronary intervention for the first time, and with at least three consecutive 6-monthly measurements of serum uric acid were recruited from Severance Hospital between January 2015 and December 2019. Uric acid variability was measured by average successive variability (ASV) and analyzed to evaluate a possible correlation with the risk of developing CVD.

Results: The patients were divided into quartiles based on the uric acid variability. Patients in the highest quartile were older and presented lower renal function and a higher mortality from CVD. There was a linear association between a high uric acid variability and the development of CVD. Compared to the lowest quartile, patients in the higher quartiles had a higher risk of CVD [quartile 3: adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.76; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.20–2.82; P = 0.019; quartile 4 aOR = 2.89; 95% CI, 1.74–4.80; P < 0.001].

Conclusion: High uric acid variability is independently associated with an increased risk of new-onset symptomatic CVD requiring percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with T2D. Thus, maintaining serum uric acid in a narrow range by prescribing effective medications is essential to prevent new-onset CVD in patients with T2D. Nonetheless, the potential use of uric acid variability as a predictive marker of CVD in patients with T2D needs further validation.

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