Table_1_The Predictive and Guidance Value of Signet Ring Cell Histology for Stage II/III Colon Cancer Response to Chemotherapy.docx (20.63 kB)
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Table_1_The Predictive and Guidance Value of Signet Ring Cell Histology for Stage II/III Colon Cancer Response to Chemotherapy.docx

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posted on 23.02.2021, 04:45 by Huici Jiang, Dongxuan Shao, Peiyu Zhao, Yupeng Wu
Purpose

To evaluate the predictive and guidance value of signet-ring cell carcinoma for chemotherapy response in stage II/III colon cancer.

Methods

Eligible patients were recruited from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database. The differences between adenocarcinoma (AD) and SRCC groups in the incidence of patients’ demographic and clinical characteristics were analyzed by Pearson’s chi-squared (×2) test. Survival was analyzed using the Kaplan–Meier method, and the differences were determined by the log-rank test. Some Cox regression models were built to assess hazard ratios (HRs) of different variables with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs).

Results

In stage II AD, it was found that the receipt of chemotherapy had significantly 12.6% decreased risk of cancer-specific mortality (HR = 0.874, 95% CI = 0.825–0.927, P < 0.001). In stage II SRCC, however, the receipt of chemotherapy had significantly 70.00% increased risk of cancer-specific mortality (HR = 1.700, 95% CI = 1.032–2.801, P = 0.037). In stage III AD, it was found that the receipt of chemotherapy had significantly 45.3% decreased risk of cancer-specific mortality (HR = 0.547, 95% CI = 0.530–0.564, P < 0.001). In stage III SRCC, the receipt of chemotherapy had significantly 24.6% decreased risk of cancer-specific mortality (HR = 0.754, 95% CI = 0.632–0.900, P = 0.002).

Conclusions

The cancer-specific survival (CSS) difference between AD and SRCC was not statistically significant in stage II colon cancer. We provided the first compelling evidence that chemotherapy should not be treated in stage II SRCC, while stage III SRCC should be treated with chemotherapy.

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