Table_1_The Impact of NOTCH Pathway Alteration on Tumor Microenvironment and Clinical Survival of Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in NSCLC.pdf (7.41 kB)
Download file

Table_1_The Impact of NOTCH Pathway Alteration on Tumor Microenvironment and Clinical Survival of Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in NSCLC.pdf

Download (7.41 kB)
dataset
posted on 09.07.2021, 05:27 authored by Xiaohua Li, Yuntao Wang, Xuebing Li, Gang Feng, Sheng Hu, Yifeng Bai

The treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) has been proven to induce lasting tumor remission. Screening suitable populations for immunotherapy through predictive markers is an important approach to improving the clinical benefits of patients. Evidence has shown that there may be a close connection between NOTCH signaling and the tumor microenvironment (TME). Hence, we explored the impact of the mutation status of NOTCH signaling on the prognosis of NSCLC patients treated with immunotherapy with the aim to apply NSCLC immunotherapy to the greatest extent possible. We examined two clinical cohorts of NSCLC patients receiving ICIs (MSKCC and NG cohorts). The mutation and prognostic data of the ICI-treated cohort were used to evaluate the association between the mutation status of NOTCH signaling and prognosis following immunotherapy. The expression and mutation data of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA)-NSCLC cohort were used to analyze the differences in the immune microenvironment under different NOTCH signaling mutation states. In the ICI-treated cohorts, the univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses indicated that high-mutated NOTCH signaling could serve as an independent predictor of NSCLC patients receiving ICIs. Patients with high-mutated NOTCH signaling had significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS) (P = 0.03, HR = 0.69; MSKCC cohort) and prolonged overall survival (OS) (P = 0.004, HR = 0.34; NG cohort). Additionally, high-mutated NOTCH signaling was related to the inflammatory immune microenvironment, inflammatory expression profile, and enhanced immunogenicity. According to this study, high-mutated NOTCH signaling may serve as a biomarker for the prediction of the prognosis of NSCLC patients treated with ICIs. A series of prospective clinical studies and molecular mechanism explorations are still needed in the future.

History

References