Table_1_The Frequency and Effect of Granulocytic Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells on Mycobacterial Survival in Patients With Tuberculosis: A Prelimina.pdf (66.88 kB)
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Table_1_The Frequency and Effect of Granulocytic Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells on Mycobacterial Survival in Patients With Tuberculosis: A Preliminary Report.pdf

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posted on 02.06.2021, 05:36 authored by Malika Davids, Anil Pooran, Liezel Smith, Michele Tomasicchio, Keertan Dheda
Introduction

Protective host responses in those exposed to or infected with tuberculosis (TB) is thought to require a delicate balance between pro-inflammatory and regulatory immune responses. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), regulatory cells that dampen T-cell function, have been described in cancer and other infectious diseases but there are limited data on their role in TB.

Methods

Peripheral blood was obtained from patients with active pulmonary TB and participants with presumed latent TB infection (LTBI) from Cape Town, South Africa. MDSC frequency was ascertained by flow cytometry. Purified MDSCs were used to assess (i) their suppressive effect on T-cell proliferation using a Ki67 flow cytometric assay and (ii) their effect on mycobacterial containment by co-culturing with H37Rv-infected monocyte-derived macrophages and autologous pre-primed effector T-cells with or without MDSCs. Mycobacterial containment was measured by plating colony forming units (CFU).

Results

MDSCs (CD15+HLA-DR-CD33+) had significantly higher median frequencies (IQR) in patients with active TB (n=10) versus LTBI (n= 10) [8.2% (6.8-10.7) versus 42.2% (27–56) respectively; p=0.001]. Compared to MDSC-depleted peripheral blood mononuclear and effector T cell populations, dilutions of purified MDSCs isolated from active TB patients suppressed T-cell proliferation by up to 72% (n=6; p=0.03) and significantly subverted effector T-cell-mediated containment of H37Rv in monocyte-derived macrophages (n=7; 0.6% versus 8.5%; p=0.02).

Conclusion

Collectively, these data suggest that circulating MDSCs are induced during active TB disease and can functionally suppress T-cell proliferation and subvert mycobacterial containment. These data may inform the design of vaccines and immunotherapeutic interventions against TB but further studies are required to understand the mechanisms underpinning the effects of MDSCs.

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