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Table_1_Soluble Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells 2 From Cerebrospinal Fluid in Sleep Disorders Related to Parkinson’s Disease.XLSX (74.29 kB)
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Table_1_Soluble Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells 2 From Cerebrospinal Fluid in Sleep Disorders Related to Parkinson’s Disease.XLSX

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posted on 2021-09-29, 04:42 authored by Mingshu Mo, Yuting Tang, Lijian Wei, Jiewen Qiu, Guoyou Peng, Yuwan Lin, Miaomiao Zhou, Wei Dai, Zhiling Zhang, Xiang Chen, Hanqun Liu, Liuyan Ding, Panghai Ye, Yijuan Wu, Xiaoqin Zhu, Zhuohua Wu, Wenyuan Guo, Pingyi Xu

Background: Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2) is a microglial receptor exclusively expressed in the central nervous system (CNS). It contributes to abnormal protein aggregation in neurodegenerative disorders, but its role in Parkinson’s disease (PD) is still unclear.

Methods: In this case-control study, we measured the concentration of the soluble fragment of TREM2 (sTREM2) in PD patients, evaluated their sleep conditions by the PD sleep scale (PDSS), and analyzed the relationship between sTREM2 and PD symptoms.

Results: We recruited 80 sporadic PD patients and 65 healthy controls without disease-related variants in TREM2. The concentration of sTREM2 in the CSF was significantly higher in PD patients than in healthy controls (p < 0.01). In the PD group, the concentration of sTREM2 had a positive correlation with α-syn in the CSF (Pearson r = 0.248, p = 0.027). Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analyses showed that sTREM2 in the CSF had a significant diagnostic value for PD (AUC, 0.791; 95% CI, 0.711–0.871, p < 0.05). The subgroup analysis showed that PD patients with sleep disorders had a significantly higher concentration of sTREM2 in their CSF (p < 0.01). The concentration of sTREM2 in the CSF had a negative correlation with the PDSS score in PD patients (Pearson r = −0.555, p < 0.01). The ROC analyses showed that sTREM2 in the CSF had a significant diagnostic value for sleep disorders in PD (AUC, 0.733; 95% CI, 0.619–0.846, p < 0.05).

Conclusion: Our findings suggest that CSF sTREM2 may be a potential biomarker for PD and it could help predict sleep disorders in PD patients, but multicenter prospective studies with more participants are still needed to confirm its diagnostic value in future.

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