Table_1_Response of Root-Associated Bacterial Communities to Different Degrees of Soft Rot Damage in Amorphophallus konjac Under a Robinia pseudoacaci.doc (1.93 MB)
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Table_1_Response of Root-Associated Bacterial Communities to Different Degrees of Soft Rot Damage in Amorphophallus konjac Under a Robinia pseudoacacia Plantation.doc

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posted on 08.07.2021, 06:04 by Fei He

Bacterial soft rot is a destructive disease that restricts the development of the konjac (Amorphophallus konjac K. Koch ex N.E.Br) industry. The objective of this study was to investigate how soft rot disease affects bacterial communities associated with the roots of konjac plants growing under a pure Robinia pseudoacacia plantation. Three sampling sites affected by different degrees of soft rot damage were selected based on the disease incidence [0%, non-diseased (ND); 4.2%, moderately diseased (MD); and 18.6%, highly diseased (HD)]. The variation in soil and root bacterial diversity and community composition among the sampling sites was determined by Illumina HiSeq sequencing of the V3–V4 hypervariable regions of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The results showed that the contents of soil organic matter and available nutrients (N, P, and K) increased with increasing damage degree, whereas higher damage degree resulted in lower soil pH and enzymatic activity (sucrase, urease, catalase, and polyphenol oxidase). The composition of root-associated bacterial communities differed among the three sampling sites. Proteobacteria was the most dominant bacterial phylum in all soil and root samples. Pseudomonas, Bacillus, Rhizobium, and Streptomyces were the most abundant in all samples from the ND sites, whereas Pectobacterium carotovorum and Serratia were predominant in the samples from the MD and HD sites. The abundance and alpha diversity of root-associated bacteria were significantly higher (p < 0.05) in the ND sites than in the diseased sites. The results suggested pronounced differences in the abundance, alpha diversity, and community composition of bacteria associated with the roots of konjac plants affected by different degrees of soft rot damage. Such differences in bacterial community structure were related to dynamic changes in soil variables, especially soil available potassium content, sucrase activity, and urease activity. Analysis of the dominant root-associated bacterial taxa offers an approach to predict the damage degree due to soft rot in konjac and provides evidence for the prevention of this soil-borne disease via microecological regulation.

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