Table_1_Rapid Evidence Assessment of Mental Health Outcomes of Pandemics for Health Care Workers: Implications for the Covid-19 Pandemic.DOCX (85.99 kB)
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Table_1_Rapid Evidence Assessment of Mental Health Outcomes of Pandemics for Health Care Workers: Implications for the Covid-19 Pandemic.DOCX

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posted on 21.05.2021, 04:46 by Sara Waring, Susan Giles

Background: Little is known about the long-term mental health (MH) impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on health care workers (HCWs). However, synthesizing knowledge from past pandemics can help to anticipate this, along with identifying interventions required, when, and target populations most in need. This paper provides a balanced evaluation of what is currently known about short- and long-term MH impacts of pandemics on HCWs and effect of methodological limitations on knowledge claims.

Method: A rapid evidence assessment (REA) was conducted on 41 studies published in the past two decades that examined MH outcomes for HCWs in relation to pandemics.

Results: Findings of literary synthesis highlight common MH outcomes across pandemics, including increased stress, distress, burnout, and anxiety in the short-term, and post-traumatic stress and depression in the long-term. Findings also show the key role that organizations and public health bodies play in promoting adaptive coping and reducing health worries and the emotional and psychological distress caused by this. Evidence highlights particular groups at risk of developing MH issues (contact with patients that are infected, having children), and time points where risk may increase (initial response phase, when quarantined). However, inconsistencies in measures, analysis, and reporting all create limitations for pooling data.

Conclusions: Findings can be used by researchers to provide a knowledge framework to inform future research that will assist HCWs in responding to pandemics, and by policy makers and service planners to provide an evidence-led brief about direction and evidence base for related policy initiatives, interventions or service programmes.

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