Table_1_Predicting Survival Duration With MRI Radiomics of Brain Metastases From Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.pdf (504.87 kB)
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Table_1_Predicting Survival Duration With MRI Radiomics of Brain Metastases From Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.pdf

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posted on 05.03.2021, 04:41 authored by Bihong T. Chen, Taihao Jin, Ningrong Ye, Isa Mambetsariev, Tao Wang, Chi Wah Wong, Zikuan Chen, Russell C. Rockne, Rivka R. Colen, Andrei I. Holodny, Sagus Sampath, Ravi Salgia

Background: Brain metastases are associated with poor survival. Molecular genetic testing informs on targeted therapy and survival. The purpose of this study was to perform a MR imaging-based radiomic analysis of brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to identify radiomic features that were important for predicting survival duration.

Methods: We retrospectively identified our study cohort via an institutional database search for patients with brain metastases from EGFR, ALK, and/or KRAS mutation-positive NSCLC. We segmented the brain metastatic tumors on the brain MR images, extracted radiomic features, constructed radiomic scores from significant radiomic features based on multivariate Cox regression analysis (p < 0.05), and built predictive models for survival duration.

Result: Of the 110 patients in the cohort (mean age 57.51 ± 12.32 years; range: 22–85 years, M:F = 37:73), 75, 26, and 15 had NSCLC with EGFR, ALK, and KRAS mutations, respectively. Predictive modeling of survival duration using both clinical and radiomic features yielded areas under the receiver operative characteristic curve of 0.977, 0.905, and 0.947 for the EGFR, ALK, and KRAS mutation-positive groups, respectively. Radiomic scores enabled the separation of each mutation-positive group into two subgroups with significantly different survival durations, i.e., shorter vs. longer duration when comparing to the median survival duration of the group.

Conclusion: Our data supports the use of radiomic scores, based on MR imaging of brain metastases from NSCLC, as non-invasive biomarkers for survival duration. Future research with a larger sample size and external cohorts is needed to validate our results.

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