Table_1_Perspectives and Management of Atypical Asthma in Chinese Specialists and Primary Care Practitioners—A Nationwide Questionnaire Survey.DOCX (19.27 kB)
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Table_1_Perspectives and Management of Atypical Asthma in Chinese Specialists and Primary Care Practitioners—A Nationwide Questionnaire Survey.DOCX

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posted on 21.10.2021, 04:15 authored by Huaqiong Huang, Wen Hua, Ruchong Chen, Yue Hu, Songmin Ying, Chunhua Chi, Min Zhang, Kewu Huang, Huiguo Liu, Huahao Shen, Kefang Lai

Background and objective: To evaluate the awareness/knowledge and clinical practice for the treatment of atypical asthma among respiratory specialists and primary care practitioners (PCPs) in China.

Methods: A total number of 1,997 physicians participated in the survey via WeChat. The questionnaire included six main items: physician demographic characteristics, awareness, diagnosis, medical prescription, assessment/education, and proposal.

Results: Cough variant asthma (CVA) was recognized by 97.51% of physicians (1,166 respiratory specialists and 799 PCPs), followed by chest tightness variant asthma (CTVA, 83.72%) and occult asthma (73.54%). Specialists were more likely to follow diagnostic recommendations than PCPs (P < 0.01); however, 34.15% of physicians reported the utility of bronchodilation tests, airway provocation tests, and peak expiratory flow monitoring. A total of 91.70% and 92.01% of physicians prescribed inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) or ICS plus long-acting beta-agonists (LABA) for CVA and CTVA, respectively. Physicians prescribed an ICS or ICS/LABA for 4 (2–8) or 8 (4–12) weeks for CVA and 4 (2–8) or 5 (4–12) weeks for CTVA, and the prescription durations were significantly shorter for PCPs than for specialists (P < 0.01). Further, 52.42% and 35.78% reported good control of CVA and CTVA, respectively, with significantly lower control rates for PCPs than for specialists (P < 0.01). Additionally, specialists exhibited better assessment and educational habits than PCPs.

Conclusion: While atypical asthma was identified by most specialists and PCPs, there remains a gap between management in real clinical practice and guideline recommendations, especially for PCPs. Further training of PCPs and clinical studies of atypical asthma are required to improve practice.

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