Table_1_Optimal Delay Time of CT Perfusion for Predicting Cerebral Parenchymal Hematoma After Intra-Arterial tPA Treatment.DOCX (99.06 kB)
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Table_1_Optimal Delay Time of CT Perfusion for Predicting Cerebral Parenchymal Hematoma After Intra-Arterial tPA Treatment.DOCX

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posted on 21.08.2018, 04:20 by Bing Wu, Nan Liu, Max Wintermark, Mark W. Parsons, Hui Chen, Longting Lin, Shuai Zhou, Gang Hu, Yongwei Zhang, Jun Hu, Ying Li, Zihua Su, Xinhuai Wu, Guangming Zhu

Background and Purpose: Cerebral hemorrhage is a serious potential complication of stroke revascularization, especially in patients receiving intra-arterial tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) therapy. We investigated the optimal pre-intervention delay time (DT) of computed tomography perfusion (CTP) measurement to predict cerebral parenchymal hematoma (PH) in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) patients after intra-arterial tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) treatment.

Methods: The study population consisted of a series of patients with AIS who received intra-arterial tPA treatment and had CTP and follow-up computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (CT/MRI) to identify hemorrhagic transformation. The association of increasing DT thresholds (>2, >4, >6, >8, and >10 s) with PH was examined using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and logistic regression.

Results: Of 94 patients, 23 developed PH on follow-up imaging. Receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed that the greatest area under the curve for predicting PH occurred at DT > 4 s (area under the curve, 0.66). At this threshold of > 4 s, DT lesion volume ≥ 30.85 mL optimally predicted PH with 70% sensitivity and 59% specificity. DT > 4 s volume was independently predictive of PH in a multivariate logistic regression model (P < 0.05).

Conclusions: DT > 4 s was the parameter most strongly associated with PH. The volume of moderate, not severe, hypo-perfusion on DT is more strongly associated and may allow better prediction of PH after intra-arterial tPA thrombolysis.

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