Table_1_Non-invasive Drug Monitoring of β-Lactam Antibiotics Using Sweat Analysis—A Pilot Study.DOCX (35.77 kB)

Table_1_Non-invasive Drug Monitoring of β-Lactam Antibiotics Using Sweat Analysis—A Pilot Study.DOCX

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posted on 25.08.2020, 04:40 by Noé Brasier, Andreas Widmer, Michael Osthoff, Markus Mutke, Fiorangelo De Ieso, Pascale Brasier-Lutz, Lisa Wolfe, Vikas Aithal, Corey D. Broeckling, Jessica Prenni, Jens Eckstein

Background: Antimicrobial resistance is a major challenge in treating infectious diseases. Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) can optimize and personalize antibiotic treatment. Previously, antibiotic concentrations in tissues were extrapolated from skin blister studies, but sweat analyses for TDM have not been conducted.

Objective: To investigate the potential of sweat analysis as a non-invasive, rapid, and potential bedside TDM method.

Methods: We analyzed sweat and blood samples from 13 in-house patients treated with intravenous cefepime, imipenem, or flucloxacillin. For cefepime treatment, full pharmacokinetic sampling was performed (five subsequent sweat samples every 2 h) using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. The ClinicalTrials.gov registration number is NCT03678142.

Results: In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that flucloxacillin, imipenem, and cefepime are detectable in sweat. Antibiotic concentration changes over time demonstrated comparable (age-adjusted) dynamics in the blood and sweat of patients treated with cefepime. Patients treated with standard flucloxacillin dosage showed the highest mean antibiotic concentration in sweat.

Conclusions: Our results provide a proof-of-concept that sweat analysis could potentially serve as a non-invasive, rapid, and reliable method to measure antibiotic concentration and as a surrogate marker for tissue penetration. If combined with smart biosensors, sweat analysis may potentially serve as the first lab-independent, non-invasive antibiotic TDM method.

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