Table_1_Molecular Detection and Identification of Babesia spp., Theileria spp., and Anaplasma spp. in Sheep From Border Regions, Northwestern China.doc (117.42 kB)
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Table_1_Molecular Detection and Identification of Babesia spp., Theileria spp., and Anaplasma spp. in Sheep From Border Regions, Northwestern China.doc

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posted on 16.09.2020, 14:54 authored by Yongchang Li, Eloiza May Galon, Qingyong Guo, Mohamed Abdo Rizk, Paul Franck Adjou Moumouni, Mingming Liu, Jixu Li, Shengwei Ji, Bayin Chahan, Xuenan Xuan

Babesia, Theileria, and Anaplasma are important causative agents of tick-borne diseases that severely affect sheep. However, there is paucity in the occurrence genetic diversity of the infections of tick-borne diseases in sheep in border regions, northwestern China. In this study, nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR) assays and gene sequencing were used to identify tick-borne Babesia spp., Theileria spp., and Anaplasma spp. infections in border regions, northwestern China. Out of 323 samples tested in this study, 225 (69.7%) sheep were infected with Babesia spp., Theileria spp., and Anaplasma spp. Two hundred six (63.8%), 60 (18.6%), 54 (16.7%), 51 (15.8%), 32 (9.9%), 19 (5.9%), and 16 (5.0%) were positive for A. ovis, B. motasi-like, A. bovis, T. uilenbergi, A. phagocytophilum, T. luwenshuni, and B. motasi-like Xinjiang, respectively. The most common dual infection was with A. ovis and B. motasi-like while the most frequent triple coinfection was A. ovis, B. motasi-like, and T. uilenbergi with coinfection rates of 17.0% (55/323) and 5.0% (16/323), respectively. Sequencing analysis indicated that A. ovis MSP4, A. phagocytophilum epank1, A. bovis 16S rRNA, B. motasi-like rap1-b, B. motasi-like Xinjiang rap1-a, T. luwenshuni 18S rRNA, and T. uilenbergi 18S rRNA from border regions, northwestern China, showed 99–100% identity with documented isolates from other countries. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of T. uilenbergi and T. luwenshuni infections of sheep in border regions, northwestern China. Furthermore, these findings provide important data for understanding the distribution of Babesia, Theileria, and Anaplasma in sheep between border countries and China.

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