Table_1_Mink SLAM V-Region V74I Substitutions Contribute to the Formation of Syncytia Induced by Canine Distemper Virus.docx (660.71 kB)
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Table_1_Mink SLAM V-Region V74I Substitutions Contribute to the Formation of Syncytia Induced by Canine Distemper Virus.docx

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posted on 21.01.2021, 04:26 authored by Yawen Wang, Jie Chen, Bo Hu, Chengyan Gong, Ning Shi, Mengjia Liu, Xijun Yan, Xue Bai, Jianjun Zhao

The Signal lymphatic activation molecule (SLAM, also known as CD150) as the cellular receptor of canine distemper virus (CDV) plays an important role in the virus-host interaction. However, it is still unknown whether amino acid differences in the SLAM variable (V) region affect the formation of syncytia. Here, using raccoon dog SLAM (rSLAM) and mink SLAM (mSLAM), we performed SLAM-V homologous modeling, site-directed mutagenesis, and surface expression analysis, as well as a cell fusion assay, to study the interaction between SLAM and CDV. More specifically, our investigation focused on two amino acid residues (74 and 129) of SLAM, previously predicted to play a relevant role in receptor-ligand interaction. Our results indicated that only residues at position 60, 74, and 129 were different between rSLAM and mSLAM among the 29 amino acids that might interact with CDV H, and residues 74 and 129 were located in the interface region interacting with CDV H. The amino acid substitution at the positions of 74 have a significant effect on the expression of mSLAM. The SLAM-V74I mutation in mink significantly improved the cell fusion efficiency of CDV. In contrast, the SLAM-I74V mutation in the raccoon dog significantly decreased cell fusion efficiency. We conclude that residue 74 of SLAM plays an important role during the the formation of syncytia. Only when implementing CDV infection analysis, the rSLAM-Q129R can significantly decreased the mean number of syncytia, but the mSLAM-R129Q can't. Additionally, residue 60 show variability between rSLAM and mSLAM. We believe that our study makes a significant contribution to the literature because we provide molecular data, partially accounting for the differences in host membrane and virus interaction laying the foundation for further molecular work.

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