Table_1_Longitudinal Associations of Stroke With Cognitive Impairment Among Older Adults in the United States: A Population-Based Study.docx (278.77 kB)
Download file

Table_1_Longitudinal Associations of Stroke With Cognitive Impairment Among Older Adults in the United States: A Population-Based Study.docx

Download (278.77 kB)
dataset
posted on 19.05.2021, 04:21 by Xia Wu, Li Fan, Songqing Ke, Yangting He, Ke Zhang, Shijun Yang

Objective: The aim of this study was to explore the longitudinal associations of stroke with cognitive impairment in older US adults.

Method: The data used in this longitudinal analysis were extracted from the National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS) from 2011 to 2019. Univariate and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate the longitudinal association of stroke with cognitive impairment. The multivariable model was adjusted by demographic, physical, and mental characteristics, and the complex survey design of NHATS was taken into consideration.

Results: A total of 7,052 participants with complete data were included. At the baseline, the weighted proportion of cognitive impairment was 19.37% (95% CI, 17.92–20.81%), and the weighted proportion of the history of stroke was 9.81% (95% CI, 8.90–10.72%). In univariate analysis, baseline stroke history was significantly associated with cognitive impairment in the future (hazard ratio, 1.746; 95% CI, 1.461–2.088), and the baseline cognitive impairment was significantly associated with future report of stroke (hazard ratio, 1.436; 95% CI, 1.088–1.896). In multivariable model, stroke was also significantly associated with cognitive impairment (hazard ratio, 1.241; 95% CI, 1.011–1.522); however, the reverse association was not significant (hazard ratio, 1.068; 95% CI, 0.788–1.447). After the data from proxy respondents were excluded, in the sensitive analyses, the results remained unchanged.

Conclusion: Older adults in the United States who suffered strokes are more likely to develop cognitive impairment as a result in the future than those who have not had strokes. However, the reverse association did not hold. Furthermore, the study suggests that it is necessary to screen and take early intervention for cognitive impairment in stroke survivors and prevent the incidence of stroke by modifying risk factors in the general population with rapidly growing older US adults.

History

References